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Bacolod City, Philippines Saturday, August 23, 2014
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Editorial

Dealing with Ebola

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Published by the Visayan Daily Star Publications, Inc.
NINFA R. LEONARDIA
Editor-in-Chief & President

CARLA P. GOMEZ
Editor

CHERYL CRUZ
Desk Editor
PATRICK PANGILINAN
Busines Editor

NIDA A. BUENAFE

Sports Editor
RENE GENOVE
Bureau Chief, Dumaguete
MAJA P. DELY
Advertising Coordinator

CARLOS ANTONIO L. LEONARDIA
Administrative Officer

Instead of abating, with all the international focus on it by doctors and researchers, the deadly Ebola virus continues to claim victims from the area it has attacked, and, as of the latest reports from specialists abroad, there is still no sign that it is easing.

The statistics released so far are troubling. The death toll has been reported at 1,350, with more than 30,000 affected whose recovery is in the strongest doubt.

The virus has been determined to have first shown up in Guinea and had spread to other countries like Liberia and Sierra Leone. What is further threatening about Ebola is that no known medication for infections seem to work against it. Since the infections began, victims seem to be falling by the hundreds and the greatest fear now is how it may manage to spread to other countries, considering the availability of international transportation now.

As of last night, reports were saying that Liberia is now the hardest hit by Ebola. And neighboring countries are all apprehensive about the possible transmission of the virus into their areas.

Several universities and research laboratories have been working in a race to find the solution to the scourge. So far, an American university has presented a new treatment identified as ZMapp that, although untested yet on humans, had been administered as a desperate measure to an American health worker infected. So far, reports say, the victim has shown improvements.

The big problem, however, is that none of the laboratories trying to find a cure, and even the one that had developed ZMapp, can produce enough to meet the rising need for it.

Meanwhile, all that the rest of the world can do, not only in the areas near the affected countries, but even in distant ones, is to ensure that nobody who may have been infected, or is showing symptoms of it, gets to their shores. In this, we commend our own Health officials who have, thankfully, managed to monitor all arrivals meticulously, so far.*

   

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